Civic Marshall Plan Planks

Plank 4: The Middle Grades

In high-poverty schools, in particular, the middle grades can either put students on a path to college and careers or steer them to dropping out. For students in these schools, early intervention is easier—and more cost-effective—than waiting until high school.1  District, state, and federal policies should strengthen the structures, norms, and processes for continuous improvement within these grades while increasing academic rigor. Evidence-based practices, including those championed by Middle School Matters, should be scaled. These practices include strengthening middle grades reading, writing, and mathematics research-based practices; increasing student social supports; and building cultures of success within the middle grades.2


  1.  George W. Bush Presidential Center. Middle School Matters.  http://bushcenter.prod.acquia-sites.com/education-reform/middleschool-matters 

  2. America’s Promise Alliance. Every Child Every Promise. Retrieved January 25, 2013, from http://www.americaspromise.org/Resources/Partner-Resources/Every-Child-Every-Promise.aspx 

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